2017

A Fascially Tight Uterus

A surprising finding in our infant research was in utero trauma. We originally thought that fetal life was pretty cushy. But that perception changed when we saw many c-section babies with compressed heads and twisted bodies requiring extensive CFT. Why?

To answer that question we need to look at the anatomy of the uterus. A normal space in a muscular uterus is about the size of an orange. We know from histology that a layer of fascia surrounds every muscle cell. At full-term the muscle and fascial tissues of the uterus must expand to the size of a watermelon.

At thirteen weeks the fetus is about the size of that three-inch orange. With the placenta, the umbilical cord, and possible fibroid tumor(s), the uterus must begin to enlarge. Multiple births accelerate the process.

But what if old trauma has strained the uterus. Instead of expanding easily, the fetus may be forced to grow against tight tissue. In addition, other nearby organs may compress the uterus in competing for abdominal space. As the fetus grows, constant pressure may create a compressive craniosacral fascial strain in its tissues.

Many times in child/adult CFT the head and neck go into inconceivable positions. We believe the craniosacral fascial system is remembering those in utero positions. Thus, patients can accurately complain about symptoms they have had seemingly their entire lives. The power of CFT is that it can correct the problem at the root cause.

In a perfect world, a woman before pregnancy could have these uterine strains released. If not then, invaluable CFT for the newborn at birth could work out these craniosacral fascial strains. If not then, a lifetime of suffering can ensue.

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