2015

Oral Ties

If I ruled the world, every newborn would have the BBS/CFT/IDM model at birth. I am assuming the large majority of babies would be strain-free within a few days. If oral ties are still creating nursing issues, then competent surgery may be a good option for the family. Since surgery creates scarring and restriction of the craniosacral fascial system, followup CFT/IDM would be recommended. We would also check in at 4-6 weeks (see: Delayed Infant Condition Model post) when some babies are dealing with deep latent strain coming out in the oropharyngeal area.

My major issue with the current tie surgery philosophy is that surgery appears to be presented as a quick fix for an isolated condition. In our infant research we found that craniosacral fascial strain starting in the pelvic floor went into the abdominal area (colic) up the GI tract (reflux) and ended in the neck/head area causing varying problems (eye, sinus, tongue, swallowing, TMJ, etc.). The key was our discovery that the head and neck issues never resolved completely until all the strain below was clear. So yes, surgery is needed in some situations, but in my world we cannot forget to look at the big picture of the craniosacral fascial system.

As a personal cathartic note, I did these tongue-tie surgeries 40 years ago. People now do not think of me as a surgeon, but I loved surgery. But after doing a few babies, in all honesty the screaming turned my stomach. I had two children under three at the time. Looking at the faces of the parents, I just could not do any more and referred out to the local oral surgeon. Looking back, I wish I could have done CFT on them to make them more relaxed. As with all of my past patients, I did the best that I could with what I knew at the time. That is why we call what we do a “practice”…..

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